Toll Free: (877) 252-1692

Key dates from the federal tax calendar.

January 31

Employers must send out W-2 Forms and 1099 Forms to employees and non-employees who provide services.

February 15

If you claimed exemption from income tax withholding on the W-4 Form you gave your employer last year, you must file a new Form W-4 by this date to continue your exemption for another year.

February 28

Businesses must file paper copies of Form 1099 with the Internal Revenue Service.

March 15

Partnerships must file for 1065 for the calendar year and pay any taxes due.

S Corporations must file form 1120S for the calendar year and pay any taxes due.

April 17

2017 individual income tax returns due, along with any tax, interest, and penalties due.

Last day to contribute to a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, or SEP-IRA for the 2017 tax year.

Estimated tax for the 1st quarter of 2018 due for those who do not pay their income tax throughout the year through withholding.

C Corporations must file form 1120 for the calendar year and pay any taxes due.

June 15

2017 individual income tax returns due for those who live outside the United States.

Estimated tax for the 2nd quarter of 2018 due for those who do not pay their income tax throughout the year through withholding.

September 17

Estimated tax for the 3rd quarter of 2018 due for those who do not pay their income tax throughout the year through withholding.

Partnerships tax returns due for those businesses that were given a 6-month extension to file returns for 2017.

S Corporations tax returns due for those businesses that were given a 6-month extension to file returns for 2017.

October 15

Individual income tax returns due for those who were given a 6-month extension to file income tax returns for 2017, along with any tax, interest, and penalties due.

C Corporations tax returns due for those businesses that were given a 6-month extension to file returns for 2017.

January 15, 2019

Estimated tax for the 4th quarter of 2018 due for those who do not pay their income tax throughout the year through withholding.

These links will let you download the Internal Revenue Service’s most frequently requested tax forms. Clicking on one of these links will download a PDF version of the form directly from the Internal Revenue Service website.

1040

U.S. Individual Income Tax Return
Form | Instructions

1040A

U.S. Individual Income Tax Return
Form | Instructions

1040ES

Estimated Tax for Individuals. Estimated tax is the method used to pay tax on income that is not subject to withholding (for example, earnings from self-employment, interest, dividends, rents, or alimony).
Form & Instructions

1040EZ

U.S. Individual Income Tax Return for Single and Joint Filers with No Dependents
Form | Instructions

1040X

Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return
Form | Instructions

Schedule A (1040)

Itemized Deductions. If you itemize, you can deduct a part of your medical and dental expenses and un-reimbursed employee business expenses, and amounts you paid for certain taxes, interest, contributions, and miscellaneous expenses. You can also deduct certain casualty and theft losses.
Form | Instructions

Schedule B (Form 1040)

Interest and Ordinary Dividends.
Form & Instructions

Schedule C (Form 1040)

Profit or Loss from Business (Sole Proprietorship)
Form | Instructions

Schedule D (Form 1040)

Capital Gains and Losses. Use this form to report the sale or exchange of a capital asset not reported on another form or schedule, gains from involuntary conversions (other than from casualty or theft) of capital assets not held for business or profit, capital gain distributions not reported directly on Form 1040, and non-business bad debts.
Form | Instructions

Schedule M (Form 990)

Making Work Pay Credit. Use Schedule M to figure the making work pay credit. This credit may give you a refund even if you do not owe tax.
Form

Schedule SE (Form 1040)

Self-Employment Tax. Use this form to figure the tax due on net earnings from self-employment. The Social Security Administration uses the information from Schedule SE to figure your benefits under the social security program.
Form | Instructions

W-4

Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate. Complete this form so your employer can withhold the correct federal income tax from your pay.
Form & Instructions

W-2

Wage and Tax Statement. Every employer who pays for services performed by an employee, including noncash payments, must file a Form W-2 for each employee — even if the employee is related to the employer.
Form | Instructions

W-9

Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification. Anyone who is required to file an information return with the IRS must obtain your correct taxpayer identification number (TIN) to report, for example, income paid to you, real estate transactions, mortgage interest you paid, acquisition or abandonment of secured property, cancellation of debt, or contributions you made to an IRA.
Form | Instructions

1099

Miscellaneous Income Statement. Every business that pays for services performed by a non-employee must file a copy of Form 1099 for each non-employee.
Form | Instructions

941

Employer’s Quarterly Federal Tax Return.
Form | Instructions

4868

Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Use this form to apply for 6 more months to file Form 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ, 1040NR, 1040NR-EZ, 1040-PR, or 1040-SS.
Form & Instructions

8863

Education Credits (American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Credits). Use this form to figure and claim tax credits for qualified education expenses paid to an eligible postsecondary educational institution.
Form | Instructions

8917

Tuition and Fees Deduction.
Form & Instructions

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

These links will let you download a number of very useful tax publications from the Internal Revenue Service. Clicking on one of these links will download a PDF version of the publication directly from the Internal Revenue Service website.

Your Rights As a Taxpayer

This publication explains some of your most important rights as a taxpayer and the examination, appeal, collection, and refund processes.

Armed Forces’ Tax Guide

This publication covers the special tax situations of active members of the U.S. Armed Forces. It does not cover military pensions or veterans’ benefits or give the basic tax rules that apply to all taxpayers.

Your Appeal Rights and How To Prepare a Protest If You Don’t Agree

This Publication tells you how to appeal your tax case if you don’t agree with the Internal Revenue Service findings in an audit or other review.

Employer’s Tax Guide

A guide to taxes for employers and business owners.

Your Income Tax for Individuals

This publication covers the general rules for filing a federal income tax return. It explains the tax law to help you make sure you pay only the tax you owe and no more.

Tax Guide for Small Businesses (for individuals who use Schedule C or Schedule C-EZ)

The publication provides general information about the federal tax laws that apply to small business owners who are sole proprietors and to statutory employees. It provides information on business income, expenses, and tax credits that may help you file your income tax return.

Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information

This publication discusses some tax rules that affect every person who may have to file a federal income tax return. It answers some basic questions: who should file; what status to use; how many exemptions to claim; and the amount of the standard deduction.

Medical and Dental Expenses (including the Health Coverage Tax Credit)

This publication explains the itemized deduction for medical and dental expenses that you claim on Schedule A (Form 1040).

Child and Dependent Care Expenses

This publication explains the tests you must meet to claim the credit for child and dependent care expenses.

Divorced or Separated Individuals

This publication explains tax rules that apply if you are divorced or separated from your spouse.

Charitable Contributions

This publication explains how to claim a deduction for your charitable contributions.

Business Expenses

This publication discusses common business expenses and explains what is and is not deductible.

Examination of Returns, Appeal Rights, and Claims for Refund

This publication discusses general rules and procedures that the IRS follows in examinations.

Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)

This publication discusses traditional, Roth, and SIMPLE IRAs. It explains the rules for setting up an IRA, contributing to an IRA, transferring money or property to or from an IRA, receiving distributions from an IRA, and taking credit for contributions to an IRA.

Survivors, Executors, and Administrators

This publication is designed to help those in charge of the estate of an individual who has died. It shows them how to complete and file federal income tax returns and explains their responsibility to pay any taxes due on behalf of the deceased person.

Health Savings Accounts and Other Tax-Favored Health Plans

This publication explains health savings accounts (HSAs), medical savings accounts (Archer MSAs and Medicare Advantage MSAs), health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs), and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs).

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.

Find your federal marginal income tax rate, (for the 2018 tax year).

Married Filing Jointly

Over Not Over Rate
$0 $19,050 10%
$19,051 $77,400 12%
$77,401 $165,000 22%
$165,001 $315,000 24%
$315,001 $400,000 32%
$400,000 $600,000 35%
$600,001   37%

Married Filing Separately

Over Not Over Rate
$0 $9,525 10%
$9,526 $38,700 12%
$38,701 $82,500 22%
$82,501 $157,500 24%
$157,501 $200,000 32%
$200,001 $300,000 35%
$300,001   37%

Single

Over Not Over Rate
$0 $9,525 10%
$9,526 $38,700 12%
$38,701 $82,500 22%
$82,501 $157,500 24%
$157,501 $200,000 32%
$200,001 $500,000 35%
$500,001   37%

Head of Household

Over Not Over Rate
$0 $13,600 10%
$13,601 $51,800 12%
$51,801 $82,500 22%
$82,501 $157,500 24%
$157,501 $200,000 32%
$200,001 $500,000 35%
$500,001   37%

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation.